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The quantity of air drawn into, and expelled from, the lungs in quiet breathing is only a fraction of that which can be inhaled or exhaled during deep breathing. The air that passes in and out during ordinary breathing is called the tidal volume. The average man after he has completed an ordinary expiration can inhale, by making the deepest inspiration possible, a large quantity of air. This air is termed the inspiratory reserve. If from normal breathing the biggest possible exhalation is made, we get the expiratory reserve. The volumes of the inspiratory reserve and the expiratory reserve i.e. The total amount of air that can be exhaled after a maximum inhalation is called the vital capacity.

Table : Definitions of lung volumes and their changes during exercise as compared with rest
Definitions of lung volumes and their changes during exercise as compared with rest


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